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Tag Archives: internationalism

Gaza protest

Some 80,000 people rallied in London over the weekend to support the Palestinians of the Gaza Strip whom Israeli forces are slaughtering daily by the dozens. This commendable display of internationalism, defined as unconditional solidarity with the oppressed and the exploited without regard to borders, colors, or creeds, was repeated all over the U.S. and Europe as thousands turned out at similar marches, even defying a government ban in Paris. Bringing this street sentiment into the halls of power, Chile’s parliament voted to suspend trade talks with Israel. Read More

Slamming the dimwits who constitute the far left’s leading lights — people like George Galloway, John Rees, and Tariq Ali — for aiding and abetting the Syrian regime’s scorched-Earth campaign against its own people might be emotionally satisfying, but it is unfair. These people are as powerless as they are clueless; they are has-beens, perpetually stuck trying (and failing) to re-live the glory days of their influence, whether that be 1968 or 2003.

What they say and do counts for little in the real world.

Far more damaging in material terms to the Syrian people’s revolution than the slander peddled by these irrelevant eunuchs are the actions of Cuba and Venezuela, two countries where the left’s influence is so vast that it holds the reigns of state power, controls media outlets, and commands armies.

Where these governments lead, leftists the world over follow. What they say is heard ’round the world. What they do matters.

Before scabbing on the Syrian revolution, Cuba and Venezuela did a dry run with the Libyan revolution. Read More

Internationalism.

Once upon a time, it was ubiquitous among progressive-minded people in the West. Once upon a time, Western progressives practiced automatic solidarity with people battling their oppression and exploitation. Borders didn’t matter. Skin colors didn’t matter. Religions didn’t matter. Jenny Marx, daughter of Karl Marx, used to wear a Crucifix not because she was Roman Catholic but to demonstrate her solidarity with the Polish uprising against Russian oppression in the 1860s.

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